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PRODUCTS

AUDIOBOOK, PAPERBACK AND E-BOOK

Maestro Orpheus and The World Clock is available as an audiobook from Apple, Audiobooks.com Audible Amazon,  Google Play, Spotify  SupportingCast,  NOOK Audiobooks,   LIbro.FMScribd, Kobo, WalmartChirp, your local library, and from 40 other retailers of audio products.

The illustrated  E-book and Paperback are available through Amazon. The text in the e-book and paperback, without the benefit of the music or sound effects in the audiobook version of the story, have been adapted for the benefit of the reading experience.

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CLASSROOM TEACHERS’ GUIDE

This 80-page guide which accompanies the story was designed for the busy classroom teacher with little or no music background, but can be used by anyone interested in further educational activities suggested by the story and the music. It was written by Joanne Grodzinski, an experienced teacher and co-creator and producer of the story, and Carolyn McMillan, a Music Resource Teacher and Orff Music Specialist.

“Ideal for elementary classroom use, this delightful musical journey takes young listeners on a time trip to learn about 15 composers and their works. Under the guise of accompanying 10-year-old Fred on his dream adventure, listeners are exposed to well-known compositions of Bach, Haydn, Chopin and others….a wealth of classroom activities, exercises and projects that cover all areas of the curriculum from mathematics to art. An intriguing introduction to music appreciation.”

- American Library Association Booklist, 1999

NOW AVAILABLE AS A KINDLE EBOOK!

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IN PLACE OF WISHES

AND THIS IS THE WAY IT BEGINS

Ten-year-old Sarah and her Uncle make up stories together whenever she visits his house.  On this visit, the story they make up is called In Place of Wishes, which is about a girl (also named Sara, but without an H) who enters a magical forest; about the people she meets there, including The Hermit, The Ferryman, and The Keeper of the Bells; and about her search for a voice that Florizel (“a young man with a name like a prince might have”) believes has mysteriously gone missing.

 

Although principally intended to charm and delight, the story is not without a moral (or perhaps even two) as the phrase “in place of wishes” draws attention not only to the time-honoured theme of “be careful what you wish for,” but also to how our choices and actions, not wishes alone, bring about desired ends.

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